Setting the Record Straight

November 16, 2008

Candidate for AG?

Specterlation About DOJsr-specterjpeg1

     This site did not intend to join all of the speculation about whom Barack Obama would or should choose to serve in his Cabinet, but we find one somewhat intriguing. It needs a lot of thought because it is fraught with danger, but it would be a twofer, perhaps a threefer.
     Largely overlooked in the heat of the presidential campaign was the extremely important need to retrieve the U.S. Constitution from the Bush administration’s shredder and begin pasting it back together.
     There are some who justifiably claim this is a matter so urgent and important, it should be at the top of Obama’s agenda instead of the economy or Iraq.

sr-spectergonzalesnprjpeg1     To bring the United States back under the aegis of the Constitution, Obama needs a dedicated attorney general already on record as one of the harshest critics of the Bush administration and its disastrous toady in the job, Alberto Gonzales, when it comes to constitutional matters.
     The selection we are talking about is Sen. Arlen Specter, R-Pa. He has been livid and unstinting in his criticism of the administration’s use of the Justice Department to run roughshod on the rights not only of detainees alleged to be terrorists, but also on its own citizens in the name of fighting terrorism.

     As a Republican, his appointment also would serve to provide someone who could act somewhat as an ombudsman to the White House to make sure it did not try to keep all the extralegal powers Bush grabbed for himself, a grab likely to be exposed when the details of all of his secret executive orders are learned. That would be Specter’s second value as the next AG.
     His third contribution would be to give up a Republican seat in the Senate and let a Democratic governor, Ed Rendell, appoint the next senator from Pennsylvania, possibly putting the Democratic majority in the Senate over the magic 60-vote line without needing turncoat Joe Lieberman to remain in the party.
     That is the positive side of this nomination. The negative is that Specter is as unpredictable as earthquakes and can sometimes go off on some gawdawful quests, none more so than his vicious behavior in the Judiciary Committee’s hearings on the Clarence Thomas nomination to the Supreme Court, who himself was a pitiful selection for the job. We don’t mean to be equally vicious here, but as a saving grace, that did occur before Specter’s brain cancer was discovered and treated.

(from http://www.straightrecord.com)

 

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November 14, 2008

Same Court For 4 Years

Just a Placeholder, Not a Changer

     The decision by the U.S. Supreme Court in a case involving sonar damages to marine animals during military training is a reminder of what the election of Barack Obama really means.sr-justicesjpeg

     Anyone looking for a change on the court during his term is likely to be highly disappointed. Obama’s election only resulted in a placeholder in the White House, not someone with an ability to change the harshly conservative tone of the court.

     Chief Justice John Roberts delivered the opinion in the case that sided with the military, in which he suggests the military and its commander-in-chief should be taken at their word. Joining Roberts were Clarence Thomas, Anthony Kennedy, Antonin Scalia and Joseph Alito.

     Kennedy and Scalia are the only two of the five who are older than Thomas’s 60, Alito being 58 and Roberts a relatively young 53. The four who manage to temper the court when Kennedy swings their way are at least 70, the oldest being John Paul Stevens at 88. Ruth Bader Ginsberg is 75, Steven Breyer is 72 and David Souter 69.

     If any change is going to take place on the court in the next four years, it is likely to be one of those four, whom Obama can now place.

     But nothing is going to change the tone, so get used to it.

(from www.straightrecord.com)

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